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Funny Story by Emily Henry: book review

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Funny Story  by Emily Henry Overview: Daphne and Peter were supposed to get married. That is until he finally decides to fall for his childhood best friend, Petra, at his bachelor party and calls off the whole wedding. He also kicks Daphne out of the new house they just moved into. So Daphne lands in an apartment with Petra's ex-boyfriend who was also newly in need of a roommate. So, while Daphne's perfect romance gets ruined, a new meet cute begins with her accidental roommate, meaning that her new couple-story will always start with, "It's kind of a funny story." Overall: 4 Characters: 4 I like Daphne and Miles. I don't feel super connected to them, like I did with the cast of Book Lovers , but I wanted to see them happy in the end. Because every Emily Henry book has to revolve around a woman with a bookish career, Daphne is a children's librarian who newly moved to Michigan for her ex-fiance. She loves her job but has no other connections to the town, s

My Big Summer Library Haul + Chatting Adult Summer Reading Challenges

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If you missed it, I moved back to my hometown after going to college in LA for the last three years, and while I'm so excited to be home for so many reasons, being reunited with my library is one of the biggest exciting things about being home. I promise you there is no better library in the world. So when I got off work early a few weeks ago, I drove straight to the library to get a massive haul of books to hopefully get myself out of a reading slump.  I've since been to the library again between getting this haul and actually finishing this blog post, so you'll see a new library haul on the blog pretty soon, but I wanted to show you my first mega haul that I was super excited about. Also, as of June 1, adult summer reading is starting, and I'm irrationally excited about it. I participated in summer reading most summers as a kid in school, and it's so cool that I can continue doing it now that I'm old (not really but older than a high schooler). At my library,

May 2024 Reading Wrap Up

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May has been another major transition month for me. I graduated from college, I got into the full swing of my summer job working 5 days a week, and I wrapped up a few writing projects and started a new major one. I also got sick and had some real bone tired days that weren't the most conducive to reading. All of this to say, I wasn't breaking any reading records this month, but I do have hope for the future seeing how the end of the month has gone! At the start of May, my life was in total disarray just trying to stay on top of everything that was getting thrown my way. I drove back and forth from Los Angeles one last time, packed up my whole apartment and took my finals, and plunged right back into work. I'm not sure if I'll ever feel fully rested again, but I'm hoping that one day life will have a normal rhythm again. Needless to say, I read one book for the first two weeks of the month. Luckily, though, in the last two weeks, I've settled in a bit better and

This Must Be the Place by Maggie O'Farrell: book review

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This Must Be The Place  by Maggie O'Farrell Overview: Daniel has many secrets and tragedies in his life that all unspool over the course of this expansive novel. The fact that his second wife is a famous actress who disappeared off the face of the earth years before feels like one of the more minor elements of his life story. We see kids born and then grown into teenagers. We observe scenes on multiple continents. The timeline is truly unlimited, but the pieces do all snap together in the end. Overall: 4 Characters: 4 Daniel is a compelling character even as he does default back to being an absolute mess at any sign of adversity. He's suffered many losses in life, but he's also experienced beautiful things. He trained as a linguist, and in his younger adult life, he marries and has kids in California. Then, after a divorce, he's cut off from his family and starts over in Ireland on a strange quest that turns into meeting the true love of his life – Claudette, the escape

Perfume & Pain by Anna Dorn: ARC review

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Perfume & Pain  by Anna Dorn Thank you to Simon & Schuster for the e-ARC and the chance to read this book early. All thoughts are my own. Overview: Astrid Dahl dropped out of law school to be a novelist, and her career leap of faith has paid off ever since. She's published multiple books, had them optioned to become movies, and managed to make an adulthood solely supported by literary pursuits. But Astrid is also battling addiction issues and an inability to skirt putting her foot in her mouth in public. She's been minorly cancelled more times than she can count both publicly online and in her own writing group. Astrid wants to get her life together; she wants to be a better person. But she's not entirely sure how to do that. Overall: 4 Characters: 4 Astrid is that perfect archetype of the "unlikable" character. She says and does plenty of things that are objectively not great. She doesn't care all that much about who she hurts with what she says, and

NetGalley Book Tag

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I wanted to do some more book tags again this year, so here's my spin on the tag that Paperbacks and Planners has preserved. This was a fun one to share, and if you're a fellow book blogger/bookstagrammer, hopefully you relate!  Auto-Approved | Who’s One Author Whose Books You Automatically Want to Read, Regardless of What They Are About? This is cliche, but I feel like I have to say it anyway, I'll read whatever Sally Rooney puts out. It took a long time for me to get to that place with Rooney–I did not get the hype around her books as a teen at all–but now I have a deep appreciation for all of her books. Aside from that, I'll read whatever novels Kaveh Akbar releases since Martyr!  is my favorite book of the year so far. Elif Batuman and Caroline O'Donoghue (who I  discovered by getting a NetGalley ARC of The Rachel Incident ) also come to mind. I'm also intrigued  to see where Lottie Hazell will go next after Piglet . I wouldn't call her auto-buy  yet bu

Filterworld: How Algorithms Flattened Culture by Kyle Chayka: nonfiction review

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Filterworld: How Algorithms Flattened Culture  by Kyle Chayka Overall: 5  I read a lot of books about social media and the internet and even more articles on the topic. I am fascinated by the internet. Despite knowing the topic well and being familiar with many of the book's anecdotes like Mechanical Turk story that opens it, I still found Filterworld  fascinating and a worthy read. If you are going to read one book about the internet, let it be this one.  Filterworld  focuses on algorithms and their increasing presence in our lives (even social media wasn't always completely algorithmically driven; anyone remember Tumblr?) and the insidious side of that both on and offline. Charting everything from TikTok's all knowing For You Page to your Netflix recommendations, Chayka gets to the heart of what these algorithms seem to do and what the tangible results are. For instance, many algorithms aren't as deeply personalized as they seem and simply push what's already popu