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Piglet by Lottie Hazell: book review

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Piglet  by Lottie Hazell Overview: Piglet likes to lose herself in food. She works at a cookbook publisher, her love language is making elaborate dinners for groups of friends or family, and eating itself also numbs her pain and worries. Food is her compass. Set to be married in only a few weeks, Piglet is navigating the stress of her strained family relationships, her pretentious in-laws, and her best friend and maid of honor potentially going into labor at her wedding. When, two weeks out, Piglet's fiancĂ© reveals that their relationships rests on a lie, Piglet has to weigh maintaining the perfectly composed life she's built against destroying it all in the name of honoring herself. Overall: 4 Characters: 4 Piglet is deeply caring and hardworking. She's an immediately likable character, and we want to see her find genuine happiness. Unfortunately, her upcoming wedding does not seem likely to deliver that. When her fiancĂ© reveals a devastating secret in the immediate lead-u

February 2024 Reading Wrap Up

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Last month, I was stuck in a bit of a The Nix  rut trying to finish one super long book all month. I also struggled to find audiobooks I connected with, which didn't help the reading slump situation. I spent a lot of my reading time doing research for my final capstone project as well. February, however, I fell back in the swing of the reading thing. After the binge reading of winter break, I've finally recalibrated and I'm able to fully appreciate books again. This means that February gets a much more traditional wrap up post. I'm going to structure these almost as mini versions of my year end posts and give insight into what I read this month (so you can hear a bit about the nonfiction I don't post about and get a preview of fiction reviews coming your way), chat a bit about what I'm hoping to read next month, and then have a quick space for non-bookish stories grabbing my attention.  If February is the month of love, then my great love of the month was fallin

Greta & Valdin by Rebecca K. Reilly: book review

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Greta & Valdin  by Rebecca K. Reilly Overview: Greta and Valdin are siblings in their late twenties in New Zealand. They share an apartment and are each other's support system. Valdin is reeling in the aftermath of his break-up with a much older man and adjusting to a major career change from physics to hosting a travel show. Greta is finding herself and panicking about how she'll ever make enough money to live with her Russian and English literature masters degree. Zooming further out, they're surrounded by a large and chaotic family. An older brother who has a teenage son and a young daughter who has no filter. A Maaori mother and Russian immigrant father. A gay uncle and his shipping magnate partner whose brother happens to be Valdin's ex. They're a tight knit bunch but full of tangles as they're trying to figure out how to live, laugh, love in these conditions. Overall: 4.5  Characters: 5 Most of the book alternates between Valdin and Greta's perspec

Good Material by Dolly Alderton: book review

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Good Material  by Dolly Alderton  Overview: Andy's longterm girlfriend broke up with him after a trip to Paris, and he's been wallowing ever since. We follow Andy as he learns to be single again at 35 and grieves a relationship he imagined would be forever. His friends aren't as present as he'd like, his ex-girlfriend moves on fast, and his comedy career is barely hanging on to add insult to injury. We watch Andy navigate a new relationship, try to revive his career, and struggle to move on from his ex because he can't find the closure he needs. Then, at end the book, we hear from his ex-girlfriend, Jen, to shade in the rest of the picture. Overall: 4 Characters: 4 Andy is a fine character. I liked him enough. He's sad but endearing and seems well intentioned for the most part. I don't think that Alderton did a bad job writing him by any means, but even though the book is written in first person, I never felt close to Andy. He shared internal feelings, but h

20 Questions Book Tag: Get to Know Me Better

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I'm excited to holding myself  to being more of a true book blogger this year instead of just a book reviewer like I have been recently. Last year, my reading really picked up, but I didn't quite hit my blogging stride. While  there's nothing wrong with just posting reviews, I want to connect more personally with my lovely community that's been here so long and let you know more of my thoughts and opinions now that I'm older! Or, if you're new here, introduce you to some of my staunch bookish opinions. I'd also  love to hear your thoughts on these topics. I had so much fun contemplating my bookish tastes and habits for  this, and it's fun to reflect on how I read. So consider this the start of more fun, chatty posts on the blog for 2024.  Credit for the 20 Questions tag goes to the fellow book blogger Zezee With Books from an index of awesome  tags on the blog. And inspiration  for doing this goes to Jack Edwards who did this tag on his second channel

Because Internet by Gretchen McCulloch: nonfiction book review

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Because Internet  by Gretchen McCulloch Overview:  Gretchen McCulloch is a linguist interested in a subfield of language that's often not taken seriously: how we use words online. And not even just words but emojis, memes, and all the other various weird forms of expression we use online. With an honest appreciation of someone who understands the power of the internet and its sub-communities, this is a really thoughtful and well rounded book, even as it is five years old and therefore ancient in terms of the internet. It covers the foundations and histories of internet communication in a thorough and open way that continues to keep it relevant. Overall: 4 I have a real love for linguistics books written for a general audience about somewhat niche pop culture topics. This book reminds me a lot of Wordslut   where you learn a lot, but the writing is also super engaging and feels current and thoughtful. Odds are, you haven't spent much time considering how you change the way you w

Martyr! by Kaveh Akbar: book review

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Martyr!  by Kaveh Akbar  Overview: Cyrus isn't attached to being alive, but he also desperately needs his death to matter. The obvious track to get there is through his writing. His poetry career hasn't gone much of anywhere since he graduated college. He honestly hasn't done much writing in the interim. He's been focused on addiction recovery and making it from one day to the next. His life has stalled, and his new recipe for making a name before his death is to write a book about martyrs whose death meant something. That sends him to New York City to meet an artist who's making her death matter. Turns out their lives are much more intertwined than it would appear. Overall: 5  Characters: 5 This book is incredible. I'll say it over and over again throughout this review. But this book is incredible. From page one, Cyrus's voice jumps out with an incredibly strong sense of who he is. Cyrus lost his mom not long after he was born when the commercial flight she