Skip to main content

I Want To Hear Your Voice: Fireworks In The Night


Hello, everyone! It's been a while since I've done an update post, so I feel it's about time. This one will be a bit different, though, because I'm not recapping books or even talking about them at all today. (Though you can find some extra bookish content treats- including my last library haul- on the blog Instagram (@readingwritingandme)
 I wanted to talk about a new adventure I'm embarking on, and, yes, it is literary.
While writing is a part of this site, I haven't uploaded much to the section. That's for a number of reasons. Many of my pieces are often tied up waiting for contest results or other publications, but, also, I just don't feel like some of my creative work is a fit for the type of content I like to post here.
I absolutely adore running Reading, Writing, and Me, and nothing is going to change about the site. In fact, I have some pretty awesome things coming up for you! But the community I've become a part of through a love of books and talking about them has made me crave something similar for my creative writing.
This is why I've decided to start my online literary journal of sorts, Fireworks In The Night. I've always wanted to be a part of a literary magazine, and now that I'm doing online school, I have the chance to help boost voices not just within my school or city but on a global scale. Who knows if I'll ever reach those heights, but this whole experiment will be worth it if I can give a few unique stories a home.
I want to hear people's unconventional, experimental, electric stories with strong voices and unique prospectives. Because I'm publishing each piece of short fiction, poetry, or creative nonfiction separately, I'm not limited by a theme or finding cohesion in a group of pieces like many other journals are constrained by. This will allow me, hopefully, to be a home for the amazing stories that fall through the cracks because they don't fit neatly in boxes.
My other major goal is to make the site a welcoming home for other teens and their words. I know how limited the field that accepts teen submissions or YA work is, and I want to offer an alternative outlet that focuses on helping people share what's important to them. I haven't been lucky enough to find a community of teen writers like I have with other book bloggers/bookstagrammers, and I'd love to be a part of building one.
If you've enjoyed the Writing page, which I will continue to update when I find the right pieces, or are a writer yourself, I encourage you to come check us out! I've already uploaded my newest short story as the inaugural piece. Our website is http://www.fireworksinthenight.com where you can subscribe to get updates on new stories. You can also keep up with us via social media: Facebook, Instagram (@fireworksinthenight), and Twitter (@fireworkslitmag). If you are interested in submitting or know someone who might be, here is a direct link to our Submission Policy and Procedures.
Again, thank you so much for making Reading, Writing, and Me so successful that I feel confident in myself enough to indulge in another passion project. The blog was a real shot in the dark, and I never thought it would become this much of a home. I hope the magazine will find a similar success to this amazing place. I look forward to seeing you both here and on fireworks. As a few last words and really the summed up core of what Fireworks In The Night is about, I leave you with these words: Everyone deserves to find a passion that makes their pulse thrum and their heart buzz in the way they do when watching beautiful, electric, explosive fireworks light up the night. Pure magic.

Links Of Interest:
Writing Page: Here
The Fragile Ordinary: Review Here
Gluten Free Eats NYC: Article Here
Made You Up: Review Here

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Spotlight Review: All Out Of Pretty

All Out Of Pretty by Ingrid Palmer (April 3)
Overview: Palmer tells the story of Andrea "Bones" and her mother as they deal with the terrifying world of drug dealing and domestic abuse. Andrea is the child Ayla, her mother, never wanted. Until her Gram's death, she'd barely spent any time with Ayla. But after Andrea finds Gram lying dead on the kitchen floor, she's sucked into Ayla's world bouncing from town to town as Ayla squanders the little money they have left. Andrea tries to use school and her status as an honors student as a bright spot in her life, though even that is threatened by their turbulent, migrant lives. Until they settle in with Judd who's worse than any scary motel. While Ayla is too drug dependent to work to break the cycle of abuse Judd inflicts on them, Andrea must formulate a plan for their escape before it's too late. Can she get them out of danger while hiding their life from prying onlookers. Overall: 5 

Characters: 5 I though…

Upcoming Spotlight Reviews

Hello, everyone! I haven't done one of these update posts about the month ahead or what's going on with the blog in a while, so I thought I'd take a minute today to share a bit about what's coming up. There are so many amazing things, but, first, I wanted to thank all of you for helping grow the blog. It means so much to me that I am reaching my largest audience yet. Remember to click the subscribe button on the main page to get email updates about new posts and to follow on Instagram (@readingwritingandme), Twitter (@readwriteandme), and Facebook which I'll link below!
One of the major things I'm focusing on going forward is giving you guys three amazing posts per week. Sundays will always be for Weekly Reviews and Recommendations while Wednesdays and Fridays will feature different reviews and articles. With Teen Book Con coming up, I'll be running a special series of reviews for all the books whose wonderful authors I get to meet!
And, of course, there a…

New Release: America Panda

America Panda by Gloria Chao (306 pages)
Overview: Mei is starting MIT a year early, skipping senior year, pushed forward by her parents who always demanded she push herself past extremes. They've also dictated that she's at MIT to become a doctor and that she will marry Eugene. Mei doesn't know how to cope with her parents rigid views and traditions that come from their Chinese culture. She doesn't feel like she can belong anywhere due to the conflicting expectations, and she knows she must sort out her feelings if she ever wants to be happy. Overall: 4.5

Characters: 5 I loved Mei. I related to her so much. We both need glasses (and don't wear them often), have a thing with avoiding germs, and are graduating early (something I never thought I'd see in a book). Watching Mei struggle between what she wants to do and what her parents want her to do. It's amazing to see how the college experience and the people around her help her sort out her feelings and carry…