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Books In New York


This week has been crazy and full of travel, so I haven't been able to be as active on the blog as I'd like to be. Today, because I'm in New York City, I wanted to make a post of some of the great books I've read that are set there. While there are tons that are missing and tons I haven't read yet, these books helped me get to know the city better before I arrived. 
Another super exciting thing about being in New York is getting to experience some of their wonderful events. I spent last night at David Arnold's NYC Book Launch for The Strange Fascinations of Noah Hypnotik and a celebration of Becky's book Leah on The Offbeat moderated by Adam Silvera. I'm hoping to get a post written about the event and reviews for the awesome books I bought very soon. 


History Is All You Left Me
When I think of books that take place in New York City, Adam Silvera is the first author I think of. All of his books (More Happy Than Not and They Both Die In The End) are set in NYC, and for good reason. One of my favorite things about Silvera books is getting to explore the city through his prospective. You can read my review of History now, and keep an eye out for my review of They Both Die which I picked up (and got signed!) last night.

The Sun Is Also a Star
Another standout story that uses New York as more than just a place to drop the characters is this novel by Nicola Yoon. As Daniel and Natasha go through a very defining day in both their lives, the city pulses behind them almost as a third main character, guiding the story like a spectacular conductor. Review Here

The Thousandth Floor/Dazzling Heights
Katharine McGee puts her own spun on the city that never sleeps catapulting us into a futuristic world where all of New York City has been swallowed into one, giant tower where new technology and age old problems follow her diverse group of teens through their lives in this shiny, new world. For More On The Thousandth Click Here and For Dazzling Heights Click Here

All of This Is True
A bit farther out, Long Island is the home of Lygia Day PeƱaflor's stunning new novel. When a group of teens find themselves best friends with their favorite author, they think life couldn't get better... until they find their secrets printed in the pages of Fatima's second novel. Review Here

Windfall
Can you imagine buying a lottery ticket and actually winning? Teddy couldn't either, but it happens to him. Alice, who actually bought the ticket before giving it to Teddy for his birthday, is shocked as well and quickly becomes concerned with the changes she's seeing in her best friend. Review Here

The Geography of Me and You
Just like in her latest, Windfall, Jennifer E. Smith set her characters loose in NYC. Starting the action in Lucy's elevator during a blackout, allows Lucy and Owen to form a bond that remains strong even as they leave the city. Review Here

Fat Girl on A Plane
Cookie is going to take over the fashion world, so of course some of this book must be spent in the fashion capital. While also set in Arizona and Argentina, Cookie does learn many important lessons in the city she thought would be her home. Review Here
Accidental Bad Girl
In an adrenaline pumping race through the city, Maxine Kaplan tells us about Kendall, a girl who stumbled into a dangerous drug ring and must find a way to collapse it to save herself. Review Here

It's Kind of A Funny Story
Though we don't get to see much of the city in this story, Ned Vizzini does bring a hopeful note to his story about getting help for mental illness and learning to have a full life. Review Here

The Light We Lost
Starting at Columbia University and moving through the city as our main character, Lucy, ages the only adult novel that I've reviewed looks heavily at regret. Review Here

Links of Interest:
The Strange Fascinations: Review Here
Fat Girl On A Plane: Review Here
Story of A Girl: Review Here
Calling My Name: Review Here

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